EP Review: Joel Whitaker's 'Ascent of the Flightless Bird'

EP Review: Joel Whitaker's 'Ascent of the Flightless Bird'

Following on from our review of Amy May Ellis’ EP ‘Weathered by Waves’, it would seem the music scene in York is full of musicians just waiting to be discovered.
Next on our radar is Joel Whitaker and his debut EP ‘Ascent of the Flightless Bird’.

The Jazz infused 7 track EP was launched with a 10 piece band in spectacular fashion at The Citadel in York on the 24th of November 2017 by Young Thugs Records.
The idyllic setting for the launch was perfect with fairy lights strewn throughout the packed venue. Support on the night came from Charlie Swainston and, one of favorites for 2018; Amy May Ellis.
The EP itself is a magnum opus, with 7 stunning tracks all neatly put together to make the perfect debut any musician would be proud of.
The opening track of the EP entitled ‘Hypnagogia’ is an ideal opener, its silky smooth intro slowly transcends into a highly entertaining and enjoyable track, with the track coming in at just under six minutes it is a definite highlight of the album.
Second track ‘Use your feet’ is a somewhat different number altogether, a slightly up tempo track which includes a heavy brass section, which is used to full advantage.

IMG_0651.jpg

The EP then moves on to a much more sombre tone for ‘The Peaceful Darkness’ and ‘Echo of the Colour Catcher’, the latter picking up the pace somewhat in the final half.
The final two tracks the single ‘Summer’s Scream/Autumns Black Leaves', have an equally stunning Youtube video to accompany it, which fits the track effortlessly, whilst the final track ‘Lullaby River’ is strikingly impressive and my favourite on the EP, it encompasses the whole feel of the EP in one track and is the perfect ending to a faultless debut.

The EP can be bought from Joel's Official Bandcamp page.

Promo Photography by Steve Piper and Young Thugs Records

Quick Fire Reviews: January Edition

Quick Fire Reviews: January Edition

EP Review: Peace Frog's 'A Message For People At Home'

EP Review: Peace Frog's 'A Message For People At Home'