Album Review: Moon Rover’s ‘It’s Time For You To Go’

Album Review: Moon Rover’s ‘It’s Time For You To Go’

Geordie alternative rockers Moon Rover release their fully fledged concept album ‘It’s time for you to go’ on the 16th of November.
The collective of 11 tracks tackle the story of an astronaut returning to earth from space, only to find that there is nuclear mayhem nearing and the dawn of a possible apocalypse is brewing...

No strangers to this sci-fi inspired theme, Moon Rover continue the tale of their astronaut that began in their debut self-titled EP and have further explored it for this new release.

The band’s niche sound stems from a love of tampering with old guitar pedals and DIY effects, which they have affectionately dubbed as “space rock”, and have adopted into their signature music style.
And this style clearly works for them, since the assortment of tracks in ‘It’s time for you to go’ have no lack of individualistic flicks and flares that make them stand out, solidifying quite early on that they take their sound and musical direction quite seriously.

The album kicks off with ‘I am a Dreamer’, a carefree anthem emphasising the importance of living life to the fullest and making the most of it. With assertive vocals, that make their presence known from the very beginning, and leisurely electric guitar notes that escalate into an engaging riff, it is an instantaneous mood lifter.

As if to showcase the variety of their abilities, Moon Rover have included ‘Rainbow’ as their third track; an acoustically focused number with delicate electric guitar accompaniments threaded through. With a life of its own, ‘Rainbow’ shines through after the explosiveness of the previous two songs and projects a self-contemplative feel that naturally occurs when one is going on a journey of self-discovery and change. It is quite easy to get lost in this song and I can appreciate the depth it adds to the album’s structure.

One of the heavier songs that stands out for me is ‘Worry Go Round’. Containing plenty of fuzz, an addictive main riff and a guitar solo that takes it from strength to strength, it develops into a super sludgy and grungy instrumental breakdown just as it seems to be ending and almost convinces me that it’s the beginning of a new song rather than a pleasantly surprising extension of the same track.

The EP ends with a bang in the form of ‘Sea of Wine’, making it a memorable ending to a memorable album. Although most of the tracks are energetic and colourful, ‘Sea of Wine’ enforces Moon Rover’s status as an alternative band with mixed influences that they have taken on and woven into their own concept.

All in all, this album exudes energy.
Not only have Moon Rover taken a specific concept and molded it into their own musical style, they have done it in such a way that it promotes a strong connection with listeners without compromising the vision and sound they have created.
Whether it’s the purely instrumental track midway through or the more energetic ensembles, the guitars drums, and bass all work in unison to provide a cohesive album with an abundance of singularities that give each song its own identity yet make all eleven of them work together collectively under a theme that can be interpreted in various ways.

Seemingly a concept album with a specific storyline, there are positive vibes emerging from it and a reminder to fully embrace living for today, even with the more sombre aspects of its theme that easily parallel the worries that perhaps many of us are troubled with nowadays.

This band has left me highly intrigued as to how their signature sound will develop and I look forward to seeing whether they will experiment further in their new ventures.
If they have peaked your curiosity, Moon Rover are launching ‘It’s time for you to go’ on the 23rd of November at Newcastle’s The Cluny 2 and if they’re as good live as they are on record, it’s going to be a belter of a night!

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