EP REVIEW: DEAF FOREVER'S 'SO YOU SAY'

EP REVIEW: DEAF FOREVER'S 'SO YOU SAY'

Of the things I’m proudest about when it comes to my generation, the invention of grunge would possibly remain the pinnacle. 
Loud, angry and confrontational, grunge continued the good work of the punk movement by reminding people of the dangers of writing off kids who don’t fit into traditional social structures and who dare to point out the emperor’s lack of clothes.  
Ignore the older generations pastiche about grunge being dirty and undignified, what it did was to, (rightfully) attack a complacent and complicit system for getting old and accepting the norm.

Whether grunge made any long-term impacts on our culture remains to be seen, but with the recent return of the movement's ‘look’ and sound, we can assume that it’s inspirational messages lingers on.  We can also assume that there’s a need for some new reckless, youthful, behaviour.

Local band ‘Deaf forever’ very much fall into the grunge category.  
Intentionally raw and sleazy their debut EP ‘So You Say’ looks to crawl out of the darkness and call out a few home truths.

Opening track ‘Liar' charmers and thieves’ gets us off to a spirited, angry, start. 
Set within the tale of an ageing street fighting man regretting his life choices, 'Liar' is an emotive story about alienating those around us as we pursue our single visions.   
Manic’s styled scuzz guitars and vocal howls provide heavy distortion to the track, stressing the regret of the lead character, emphasised by the repetition of the lines "if you’d have told me" at the tracks fade out.   
It’s a hell of an opening track.

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‘Preacher’ moves us into a darker, heavier, environment.  Battle broken and weary, our lead singer sounds more like die-hard grunge god Scott Wieland in a vocal style that is deliberately slurring and dipped in darkness.  Failing to quite reach the highs on the chorus, the track’s strengths shine through in its verses and their tales of self-despair and regret.

Final songs; ‘You Say’ and ‘All Seeing Eye’ move us back into top form with scratchy guitars and exploding choruses.  While 'You Say' is underpinned by a Fugazi-style punk/funk sound, 'All Seeing Eye' attacks us with a Nirvana sounding chugging riff. Both styles prove effective and purposeful.

Deaf forever may not yet be our answer to Nirvana or Stone Temple Pilots, but these tracks prove that there is certainly potential.  Shining in their darkest and heaviest moments, the Forever's should become a force to be reckoned with. 
A terrific debut.

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