Single Review: You Are The Dead's 'The Mind'

Single Review: You Are The Dead's 'The Mind'

'The Mind' is the second single release for Whitley Bay-based electronic grunge duo You Are The Dead.

This track is a total blast from the past, as it very much identifies with underground 90s rave and dance music; taking you to a sweaty darkened room with neon rave lights, a distinctive smell of alcohol and wild pulsating bass tracks, as people dance the night away.

Their sound is quite similar to the likes of Ministry, early Nine Inch Nails and The Prodigy as the band take quite an industrial, wild approach to their music.
'The Mind' of course, is no exception, as the track starts out with a simple drum machine beat and gradually leads the other levels of synth, muffed guitar and bass in.

The rhythm of the song stays the same throughout, however the other instruments seem to mutate around it. The vocals take quite an evil, robotic sound, continually chanting “Come in to my mind, Come in to my mind, Come into my mind, and see what you can find". Intimidating as they are, these vocals are actually extremely successful at making the song sound very mechanised and grungy. I kind of get the feeling I'm in some sort of Terminator/Matrix crossover.

The bass also phases dramatically in and out, which is a widely recognised, classic feature to have in a track like this and plays the part of the main supplier of rhythm and dance throughout this song.

'The Mind' to me seems very rough and grinding musically, due to the nature of the muffled guitar. It sounds like some sort of saw hacking at wood or something very thick and heavy. However not in terms of production, overall its quite neat and tidy. I think that you can really tell that these two really know their stuff and how to produce a track properly, which can often be the difference between a great song, and a terrible one.


Single Review: Twist Helix's 'Newcastle'

Single Review: Twist Helix's 'Newcastle'

Single Review: Into•The•Deep's 'Fall'

Single Review: Into•The•Deep's 'Fall'