Album Review: 'Kketterwaul' by Kkett

Album Review: 'Kketterwaul' by Kkett

Northumbria based math-rockers Kkett released their debut album ‘Kketterwaul’ at the beginning of the month, making an enormous impact on a region with few established experimental bands to follow in the footsteps of.
The four piece are well on their way to pioneering the genre up north with challenging lyrics, big riffs and - like true Geordies - Greggs references.

The eight song album opens with ‘Kraken a Bath’, which encompasses just about everything Kkett has to offer: catchy melodies, sporadic groove changes and powerful, memorable vocals.
Some sections are reminiscent of Biffy Clyro’s early days, emphasised by their Northern accents belting out. The first song on any album is arguably the most important - it sets the tone, sound and atmosphere for the rest of the record. For first time listeners, it also introduces these elements of the band as a whole. Kkett really hit the nail on the head with this track and it provides the perfect level of intrigue to excite you for the rest of the album.

‘The Hunchbatch of Alesund’ is one of the heavier tracks on the album.
The progressive metal elements really shine here and demonstrate some of the most complex and intricate drum work I’ve heard in a long time.
This will definitely be the song I’ll be waiting for at their live shows.

Album structure can be pivotal in audience retention, and Kkett certainly made the right decisions in Kketterwaul. ‘Bill Oddie Bastard Bitch’ takes a calmer approach, but then we dive straight back into heaviness in ‘Bughunter’ with a real System of a Down attitude running through.
Four tracks in and I’m excited to see where each new track is about to take me next, I’m starting to wish there was more than just eight on the album!

'(I can’t wait for) Nothin’ But Nasal Cramps' was my first introduction to Kkett after they shared a live performance on their Facebook page, so it’s brilliant to hear the recorded version. I’m a big fan of the guitar work in this track, the riffs are extremely catchy and are probably (for me) the stand out element of the album.
Strong vocal harmonies are a key component of Kkett’s sound and they demonstrate their ability perfectly here.

The album climaxes with further experimentation - you can feel their technical boundaries being stretched and it pays off handsomely.
'Death in the Disco Toilets' goes all out and overflows with energy, this will certainly be a crowd favourite.
The track provides an enormous finale with a riff Black Sabbath would be proud of, rounding off one of the best local albums I’ve heard in a long while.

One thing many math rock bands fall into the trap of is trying too hard to jump from one section to another, however Kkett manage to maintain a high level of unpredictability without becoming random.
You can feel a sensible and logical progression throughout each of the eight tracks, with a consistent sound to accompany it.
Many bands in the genre try to find a mainstream sound while keeping to their roots (Press To Meco spring to mind) and while this is by no means a negative, it can inhibit creativity and freedom. Kkett aren’t afraid to take chances, be creative and throw a blast beat in when they feel like it.
I’m very excited to hear what they do next and, by furthering their production quality to allow for their grand ideas to surface, I believe they have a very bright future ahead.

Words: Jake Fernandes

Photography: JBottPhoto

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