Single Review: ‘The Youth Abide’ by Lovejoy

Single Review: ‘The Youth Abide’ by Lovejoy

‘The Youth Abide’ is an anthem of a track with its signature distinctive vocals and raw instrumentals, both of which continue the gnarling sound of Lovejoy’s earlier 2019 release, EP, ’Home Brew’.  

With its jolting guitars, enraged vocals and an exclaiming outro, which creatively includes an empty keg used as a snare drum, the track emulates a homespun frisson of punk.

From the immediate demand of the opening statement “Let’s Go” to the “public service announcement” half way through the track, there’s a hint at nostalgic pop punk in the inclusiveness of ‘The Youth Abide’ which makes it seem fitting for live consumption and comes just in time for their headline gig at Cluny 2 on 8th August.

The accompanying track ‘Feels Alright’ is a short sample of a genre switch for Lovejoy which, if you’re already familiar with the band, naturally ensnares your attention, possibly the most out of the two releases.
The new musical form is more spoken word than a hammering rock tune, meandering through at less than two minutes. With the accompaniment of bluesy guitar there’s an almost hollow feeling to the indie sound of the track, especially coming straight off the back of ‘The Youth Abide’ and it’s hectic instrumentals. That’s not to say the shift is a negative thing, just a little jarring on the first listen.

It continues the theme of youth in a destructive society, appealing to the world “to give us hope, finally give us a chance”.
But, though the opening line seems serious, ‘Feels Alright’ goes on to employ humour and anecdotes of fancying a lass, to make a declaration about what it really is to be young.

The use of northern dialect which was sampled in earlier tracks resurfaces here, continuing to put an individualistic stamp on Lovejoy’s sound. 
I don’t know if it’s just me but being from a region that’s so underrepresented, on the whole, in the wider music scene it’s refreshing to hear a north eastern dialect and familiar terminology utilised so boldly.

With a fearless approach to the music they make, lyrics that speak honestly for a generation, and represent the region in particular, there really is an important place for Lovejoy and their music. And with hints about another EP release in the near future I’m eager to hear what genres and topics the band will explore next.

Single Review: 'S[care]d' by Hivemind

Single Review: 'S[care]d' by Hivemind

Gig Review: Holding Out ft. Too Close For Missiles / Primary Colours / Hometruths

Gig Review: Holding Out ft. Too Close For Missiles / Primary Colours / Hometruths